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Word Processing


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Keywords: Word Processing, text
Subject(s): English/Language Arts, Technology
Grades 6 through 8
NETS-S Standard:
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Communication and Collaboration
  • Technology Operations and Concepts
View Full Text of Standards
School: Henry T Gage Middle School, Huntington Pk, CA
Planned By: Paul Rallion
Original Author: Paul Rallion, Huntington Pk
1. Anticipatory Set
- Focus/Transfer: What machines were used for typing before computers? Typewriters! The typewriter was invented in 1867, and they took a long time to evolve from mechanical to electronic. In the late 1980’s we had electronic typewriters that allowed you to edit a single line before printing it on the paper. With the new era of computers in the 1990’s, word processing became popular.
- Objective: You will learn how to use Microsoft Word® to produce attractive, professional word processing documents. This very handout was produced using a word processor.
- Purpose: To comply with Computer Technology Standard #8: Select and use the appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems.

2. Instruction

1. Anticipatory Set
> Focus/Transfer: Typing is like writing electronically. Just like your handwriting, how you organize your typing says something about yourself.
> Objective: Students will learn the basic window of a word processor, namely, Microsoft Word, and how to align text within their document.
> Purpose: To comply with Computer Technology Standard # 8: Select and use the appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems.

2. Instruction
What is a word processor for?
> You use a word processor to write and format text. For example, to type letters and memos, to create lists, to keep a personal journal, to type your homework, reports, etc.


The Word Processor Window
> When you open an MS Word, you’ll see a blank window. Locate the insertion point (where you can start typing!), the standard toolbar, the formatting toolbar, the margins, and page guides. In general, text in a word processing document looks the same on the screen as it does when printed.

Typing Text
> Begin typing text. Do not press Return (or Enter) when you reach the end of the line. The word processor will wrap the words to the next line. You press Return (or Enter) to end a paragraph. Press Return (or Enter) again to insert a blank line. If you wish to delete a character (letter or symbol), place the insertion point to the left of the character and press Delete (in Windows). Place the insertion point to the right of the character and press Delete (in Macintosh) and Backspace (in Windows).

Aligning Text:
> To align a paragraph, place the insertion point in the paragraph and click one of the alignment controls on the ruler.
Text aligned to the left will have a “misalignment” on the right.
Centered text is mostly used for titles in documents.
Text aligned to the right will have a “misalignment” on the left.
Justified text is aligned on both left and right sides of your document

> Check for understanding: Students will be asked questions:
- What is the difference between the different kinds of alignments? (the way the word processor arranges the text along the margin)
- Why don’t you need to press Enter or Return at the end of the line? (because the word processor will wrap the words to the next line).

3. Guided Practice
> Teacher reviews the basics of word processing.
> Activity: Have students type: be creative with the activities to be done!

4. Closure
> Students take a quiz on word processing.

5. Independent Practice
> Homework #8: Word Processing questions.


Source: My COMPUTeachER, The Computer Book for Everyone.
Get your copy at: www.PaulRallion.com


Materials: Integrating Technology, Mobile Labs