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Lesson Plan Name Grades
Flipping Over Romeo and Juliet! Translating Shakespeare Into Standard American English 8 to 8
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
Students will record performances of important scenes from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and use appropriate software to add subtitles to the scenes, which are translations of Shakespeare's Early Modern English into Standard American English.
Reenacting Shakespeare 9 to 12
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
Students analyze scenes from Romeo and Juliet and recreate scenes through modern skits.
Technology for the Likes of Shakespeare and Poe 7 to 12
(0 stars, 3 ratings)
Digital Storytelling, a wonderful way to incorporate technology and other disciplines into the Language Arts classroom, despite endorsement from the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), is not a priority for most schools. I believe that to incorporate digital storytelling, you must have the technology necessary to enable the teacher to adjust her pedagogy and see her role as story coach instead of technology teacher, allowing digital storytelling to enable students to represent their voices in a manner rarely addressed by state and district curriculum while practicing the digital literacy skills that will be important to their 21st century futures while supporting whole language literacy practices. .
Antony vs. Brutus 9 to 12
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
In groups of four, students will create an advertising campaign based on their given character/speech of Antony or Brutus from Shakespeare's Caesar. Students will use the project as means of debate focusing on the which character should have control of Rome after the death of their former leader, Caesar.
Podcasting the Bard 2 to 5
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
Students read and perform readers theater adaptations of Shakespearian plays.
Creating a Drama 9 to 9
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
The students will plan, direct, and record a scene from Romeo and Juliet.
Getting to Know the Characters in The Tempest P-K to P-K
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
This lesson is about characterization and Shakespear's play, The Tempest
Pair Ideas:Parody 6 to 12
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
After studying a poem, play, or novel considered to be a "literary canon," students will write and videotape a parody of it utilizing live musical or acting performances, LEGO animation, or puppet theater to share with peers and then serve as mentors for middle school students to recreate this process. All videos will be accessible on a web blog site or through a Google Drive or dropbox.
Poetry Alive! Interpreting Poetry Using Digital Images 9 to 12
A team of English students will take the role of a production company and will create a 4-5 minute film using the digital image as a medium for interpreting students’ original poems. Three classes will be working together in order to complete this project: Creative Writing, English, and The Actor’s Studio.
Poetry and Photography 7 to 8
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
Using a digital camera to help students understand poetry
Reviving the Renaissance 7 to 12
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
Using the world wide web, students will research the Renaissance Era and present a multimedia project to classmates which will focus on one aspect of that time period: food, clothing, pastime, gender roles, law enforcement, etc. This is done prior to reading any of Shakespeare's literature.
What do you know? 4 to 12
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
This is an exercise that has a pre and post casual assessment using polleverywhere.com It assesses what is known before a unit and afterwards by using cellphones and computers
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