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Search results for poverty:
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Lesson Plan Name Grades
Poverty Point Native Americans 2 to 3
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
Poverty Point Native Americans and Landmark in Louisiana (Rotation Day 1 with Centers)
Technology-Assisted "7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens" 9 to 10
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This unit teaches teens the underlying principles that are essential to achieving their goals and personal success. The activities, described in detail below, support an understanding of each of the 7 Habits along with any important terms and the application of those habits into the daily lives of the students through the implementation of “baby steps” that will be monitored twice a week by the students’ personal mentor and supplemented with a wide range of technological hardware and applications.
Candidate Obama Support and President Obama's Agenda 7 to 8
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Support letters via Microsoft Word for Candidate Obama ... sent to Obama Headquarters in Chicago [received Obama response] ... then PowerPoint presentations of President Obama's Agenda researched at www.whitehouse.gov ... sent as followup to the White House.
Claymation Video Lessons 5 to 12
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Students will create simple 3D oil-based clay characters, which will move through 2D student-created environments(stop-action videography). Students will narrate the stories thus created.
If Hornets Could Talk... 5 to 5
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
As a teacher, I find myself constantly challenged to integrate the state and parish standards, grade level expectations, ILEAP test preparation, and multi-disciplinary lessons, at the same time keeping my students engaged, excited, and learning. At times I find the students either bored or discouraged with basic assignments, in particular reading, writing, and researching. I find that no matter how important the components being taught, without a “catch” or “hook,” the students view the assignments as redundant and see no connection with real life. I’ve found a “hook!”
If I Were 100 Years Old... K to 3
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For the 100th day of school, my first graders are asked to write about what they would and would not be able to do if they were 100 years old. To update this lesson, I would have them dress up as if they were 100 years old and record their thinking in a flip video.
Language and Literacy Support through Photography K to 8
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This project provides ideas and activities for promoting development of oral language, literacy, and student identity through the use of photography-based Language Experience Approach lessons and books.
Save the Rainforest in South America 6 to 8
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7th Graders: Geography affects the characteristics of a country. Natural resources can determine the success or failure of a country. Each country is rich in culture, even if they are a poor country. Each student will appreciate his or her life‐styles, and opportunities compared to poverty stricken countries. Global issues are complex, and the student will explain the challenges the rainforest ecosystem is facing, and will develop a plan of action they can do to help
Through Our Eyes 9 to 9
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“The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros is a novel that addresses many important themes, but none more important than poverty. But simply talking about a world problem does not teach my students as much as a hands-on problem solving project would! Upon completing the novel, my students will tackle the final project “Through Our Eyes.”
Using technology to engage students in science through inquiry research 11 to 12
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My students love to talk about the latest YouTube video so why not engage them through video based research projects? As a central part of an ethology (animal behavior) inquiry research project, my advanced biology students will be collecting data in small groups at a local zoo.
Written in Bones 6 to 8
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Students will read literary and informational texts about the stories of our past to understand how different texts offer unique historical perspectives and how authors sometimes alter details of history to serve a purpose. Students will express their understanding by corroborating details of the past, deciphering an author’s purpose, and writing their own fictionalized version of a historical account.
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