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Search results for primary and secondary sources:
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Lesson Plan Name Grades
Elementary Lessons for Primary and Secondary Sources 3 to 4
(0 stars, 3 ratings)
Primary and Secondary Sources Lessons
Primary and Secondary Documents for Colonial Times 5 to 6
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
Primary and Secondary Documents for Colonial Times Lesson Plan
Addressing the Nation 6 to 8
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
My goal is to connect my students to the past by applying it to the present thus making it relevant to their lives. I want my students to start asking the questions like: “How would history be different if Abraham Lincoln was not the president during the Civil War?” “How do certain people affect how our past has been shaped?” Once they begin to ask these questions they will then be forced to see that history is shaped by the people who are involved. Therefore, it is our responsibility to elect effective leaders to government.
At the Top of Mississippi: Southaven 6 to 8
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
Project – At the Top of Mississippi: Southaven Students will report and record personal events, people and places that are important to them in their daily lives. They will then, with their classmates, combine their efforts and produce a DVD that will be presented to the City of Southaven and the Southaven Chamber of Commerce to give to families that are interested in relocating to our city. This will promote Southaven in a positive manner through the eyes of our youth.
Family History 2 to 5
Students will take photographs of their family and gather pictures to create a family tree.
Forming Author's Perspective 2 to 5
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
Students will be introduced to the concept of Author's Perspective by identifying specific opinions and adjectives from a specific article. This lesson plan is aligned with Marzano.
Fredrick Douglass...A digital History 7 to 7
Using technology, the students will create projects that depicts the stuggles of slaves with a focus on Fredrick Douglass and his determination to abolish it.
Preserving Living Legacies 9 to 12
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
This is an oral history lesson which engages students to research a top of United States History as related to the actual life experience of a senior member of our town community. Students will research, prepare interview questions, interview a senior, videotape their interview, and publish their findings in book form.
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