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Lesson Plan Name Grades
You're my Hero 3 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Children will create a hero and an arch rival. We use a Manga 8 1/2 heroic proportion guide and discuss complementary colors for costumes.
"The Five Life Zone Research Project" 7 to 8
(5.0 stars, 3 ratings)
Students in grade 7 and 8 will travel from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to the Grand Canyon in Williams, Arizona to investigate and measure the soil and water quality (if water can be found) for each of five life zones. The five life zones are the Lower Sonoran or low hot desert; the Upper Sonoran or desert steppe; the Transition or open woodlands; the Canadian or fir forest; and the Hudsonian or spruce forest. This is equivalent to studying the life zones found from Mexico to Canada. The latest technology will be used to complete the field studies and record and communicate their findings.
3 Minutes of Fame 4 to 4
(5.0 stars, 2 ratings)
Students will create info-mercials (commercials) using video cameras and digital cameras to advertise eco-friendly products by explaining how other products deplete environmental resources (such as plastic and paper products).
A Day in the Life of ... 10 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Overview: Evansville, IN offers many opportunities for students to experience high tech product creation.Students will video the life of a product being manufactured in Evansville at such companies like Mead Johnson Nutrition, Berry Plastics Corporation and AmeriQual Foods.
A Picture's Worth a Thousand Notes 6 to 12
(5.0 stars, 2 ratings)
Providing a visual representation of a classical piece of musical literature. Creating a listening map for a classical piece using digital photography and computer presentation format.
A tribute to Willis. 11 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
A culmination of a semester's worth of prep which includes, the history of stop motion animation, clay character design and production, writing story concepts, creating storyboards and building dioramas. All leading to the production of a digitally animated stop motion film.
All About Safety 9 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Robotics Class students will learn about safe operation of equipment in the robotics lab. As groups, students will create pod-casts summarizing their learning and teaching others about safely using machinery and tools.
An Entertaining Assignment 11 to 12
Make a gossip style video about a medieval character and the rules of Courtly Love and Chivalry they have either broken or upheld. Video may be shot using a Flip video camera from the media center and edited using MovieMaker.
And Action ........ Stop Motion Style 9 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Cross-Curriculum project integrating Art (sculpting) and Technology (Video Editing, Web 2.0 (Video Sharing),
ANIMATION - Exploring graphic, movie making and audio software 5 to 8
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Students will create their own images and use movie making software to create an instructed animation. To remediate skills and enhance creativity, students will create an additional animation of their choice. There is an extra credit audio option.
Animation Book Report 6 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Students will read a non-fiction book of choice and express their understanding of the book through an animation project. Students may choose clay animation, white board animation, sticky note animation or human subject/stop animation.
Animation Festival 5 to 6
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
5th and 6th grade students will create claymation and object animation shorts to be produced as a short film festival. This lesson is actually a unit on animation comprised of several weeks of group work and filming.
Animation Pre-Production 3 to 12
(5.0 stars, 6 ratings)
Students will learn the process of animation from concept to a short storyboard/ comic strip. They will walk through the steps of developing a character creating a story around that character and imagining what they will look like.
ANIMATORS AND LEGO MANIA! 2 to 6
(5.0 stars, 2 ratings)
Students will work in groups and create a short informational animated movie on animals they read about. They will use a storyboard to develop their short story.
Antony vs. Brutus 9 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
In groups of four, students will create an advertising campaign based on their given character/speech of Antony or Brutus from Shakespeare's Caesar. Students will use the project as means of debate focusing on the which character should have control of Rome after the death of their former leader, Caesar.
art tech club 5 to 7
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Interested and motivated students in various grades join one of my Friday "art club" groups. At least one group spends their time making an animated movie.
Artists in Power Point 6 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Artist history comes alive to students when they make a power point about the artists. They are encouraged to find online images from the artists' works and incorporate them along with pertinant information to create a techhie bio of them.
Battleship 5 to 5
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Our fifth grade students learn about the American Revolution. I had tried to incorporate learning Microsoft Excel by turning it into a fun game
Black History Month Podcast "A Conversation Between Presidents Lincoln and Obama" 4 to 7
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
There are many interesting similarities and differences between the lives and presidencies of Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Barack Obama. A meeting between these two gentlemen would be the foundation of a great conversation and/or debate!
Bracket Madness! 9 to 12
(5.0 stars, 2 ratings)
Students will "compete" against each other by utilizing various forms of imagery to compliment their research-based presentations in an attempt to end up in the championship bracket. Although the original idea is for a "Most Courageous Person in History" presentation, it is a concept that is easily adapted to any classroom curriculum.
Can You Hear Me? 6 to 12
(5.0 stars, 1 ratings)
Humor in forms of nonverbal communication (political cartoons and comic strips) is often used in place of a narrative form of communication. This nonverbal form of communication provokes the reader to infer, use imagination, and prior knowledge to interpret the authorís purpose.
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