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Song Creation: Of Mice and Men vs. The Greatest Game Ever Played


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Keywords: Song, Literature, The Greatest Game Ever Played, Of Mice and Men, English, Music, Editing
Subject(s): Reading, Music, History, Writing, Grammar, Technology, Spelling, Social Skills, Art, English/Language Arts
Grades 9 through 12
NETS-S Standard:
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Communication and Collaboration
  • Research and Information Fluency
  • Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
  • Technology Operations and Concepts
View Full Text of Standards
School: Stanhope Elmore High School, Millbrook, AL
Planned By: Kristine Forney
Original Author: Kristine Forney, Millbrook
STANDARDS:
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.9-12.1]

2 ) Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.9-12.2]

3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.9-12.3]

4 ) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. [RL.9-12.4]

6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.9-12.6]

7 ) Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. [RL.9-12.7]


10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.9-12.1]


11 ) Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. [RI.9-12.2]


12 ) Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. [RI.9-12.3]

16 ) Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. [RI.9-12.7


19 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-12.1]

20 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. [W.9-12.2]

21 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.9-12.3]

22 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 19-21 above.) [W.9-12.4]

23 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-12.) [W.9-12.5]


24 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. [W.9-12.6]

28 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.9-12.10]

29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 9-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.9-12.1]


30 ) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data. [SL.9-12.2]

31 ) Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. [SL.9-12.3]

35 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.9-12.1]


37 ) Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. [L.9-12.3]


38 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.9-12.4]

39 ) Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. [L.9-12.5]

LESSON 1: Introducing Of Mice and Men
The teacher will use an audiobook to read Of Mice and Men during class while stopping at different points to assess understanding while students take Cornell Notes and discuss in groups. Depending on student understanding, possible film will be used in addition to support comprehension.
*Why do you think the author used this dialect in writing this novel? Using specific examples, what does this line mean based on the dialect presented?
*How does this novel link to history?
*If you were to relate to a specific character in this novel, who would it be and why?
*If you were in George's shoes based on taking care of Lennie, how would you handle the situation?
*Do you think the ending of the novel was fair? Why or why not?

LESSON 1 TECHNOLOGICAL EXTENSION ACTIVITIES
Students will research the historical context of The Great Depression and migrant workers to share on a class interactive Google Drive file to add to their Cornell Notes.

LESSON 2: Introducing The Greatest Game Ever Played
The teacher will use a copy of The Greatest Game Ever Played during class while students complete Cornell Notes Venn Diagram to start the compare and contrast application of the content. The film will be stopped at different intervals for class and group discussion.
*What similarities do you see between Of Mice and Men and The Greatest Game Ever Played?
*How are George and Francis alike and different?
*How are Lennie and Eddie alike and different?

LESSON 2 TECHNOLOGICAL EXTENSION ACTIVITIES
Students will research the historical context of the 1913 US Open on a Google Drive file to share with the class and then to add to their Cornell Notes Venn Diagram since The Great Depression is close in this time frame.

LESSON 3: Song Creation
The teacher will introduce the class project based on creating a song where the main characters from Of Mice and Men and The Greatest Game Ever Played are compared and contrasted in a lyrical delight based on a rubric. Students will collaboratively work in groups using a Google Drive file to write the song lyrics while having access to use rhyming dictionaries online and find appropriate background music for eventual recording. Students will also have access to online resources based on editing created songs before the class will listen to the created songs as presentations.

LESSON 3 TECHNOLOGICAL EXTENSION ACTIVITIES
Students will work together using the chromebooks to write, research, record, and edit their song creations.

Because approximately 50% of the student population received free or reduced lunch, many students do not know how to properly research and use technology in an educational capacity. My goal is to close the technology gap in the student population in addition to helping students have more creative outlets to show their comprehension levels. This will allow students the chance to have more opportunities in an educational setting to decide what they enjoy based on discovering their career possibilities. In turn this will help students see how they can make a difference in the community doing something they love.
Cross-Curriculum Ideas
Music, Art, Reading, History
Materials: Mobile Labs
Other Items: 1 32 Classroom Set of Acer C270P Touchscreen Chromebooks with Secure Charging Cart (Item #: CSC04), $5049.00 each, total of $5049.00