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Lesson Plan Name Grades
America's Generational Segments 9 to 12
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After learning the different segments of America's Generations - students are to create a visual of the generation they have chosen to research and document via pictures.
Heads or Tails? Studying Regeneration in Planaria 10 to 12
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Students will brainstorm stem cells, help create a concept map, and view a video lecture or clip prior to performing an experiment (found at HHMI's Biointeractive site) in which they investigate regeneration in Planaria. They will relate this flatworm's ability to regenerate to stem cell study.
Legacy Project: Using Flip Cameras to Connect Generations 9 to 12
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This lesson will enable students in Ms. Barb Ressler's English classroom at Wahlert High School to capture insights from senior citizens by utilizing flip cameras. As a result, the students will be able to learn many important life lessons and build important connections with senior citizens.
Sustainability & Systems-Seven Generations 5 to 6
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This is a lesson meant to teach about sustainability while introducing students to a variety of new technologies. They will use Wordle, Google, and view You Tube video to help their understanding of the concept of sustainability
The Greatest Generation Voice Thread 6 to 8
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After hearing a guest speaker(s) from the Greatest Generation, create Voice Threads that showcase their lives, and their contributions to America during WWII
The Greatest Generation: Capturing Their Stories with Digital Images K to K
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Digital Storytelling with the Greatest Generation is the focus of this basic primary source recording of extended family members.
Structures and Functions of plants and animals 4 to 4
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This lesson is part of a unit to meet grade 4 Life Science Standards, Structures and Processes. In this lesson, students will conduct research on various animals and or plants to determine what external structures support survival and growth. In addition, students will use technology to publish their findings to a blog and have the ability to comment and respond to other classmate’s blogs, learning from each other’s experiences.
A Microscopically Enormous Look at Genetic Inheritance 9 to 12
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A lab to help better understand how traits are controlled by genes using drosophila fruit flies.
Adapting to Life by the Wild Myakka River 6 to 9
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Students will use digital still and video cameras to capture organisms adaptations to their local environment while on a field trip to Myakka River State Park. Students will then use the captured media to create a digital interactive poster (Prezi) that they will present to the class.
American Indian Digital Storytelling 9 to 12
Robeson County is the home of the Lumbee tribe, the largest American Indian tribe east of the Mississippi River. After learning the general history of the Lumbee people, students will select a specific feature of Lumbee history or culture to create a "digital story."
Animation 9 to 12
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Through the exploration of animation techniques, students will be able to describe and depict emotions and expressions with processes, traditional tools, and modern technologies used in the arts.
AP Biology & Inquiry-Based Labs 11 to 12
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Instead of carrying around an encyclopedic textbook, students will have their text downloaded onto an iPad where they can highlight, bookmark, and find definitions instantly without ruining the book next year. Students will also be using their iPad for creating, reviewing, and sharing their own labs.
Coding in a Different Way! --Secret Code Messages 4 to 6
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Students will be able to create a rolling robot that flashes the light cube in morse code, so as to communicate a brief message to the students on the other side of the classroom.
Computer Basics P-K to P-K
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A lesson that teaches students what a computer is, and the types of computers we use today.
Create A Keychain using 3D design P-K to 9
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
In this lesson my students will be able to utilize online 3D software to create a "marketable" keychain and print it out on a 3D printer. This will let students take ownership of this process by making it their own and understanding how to begin an entrepreneurship.
Digital Journaling in the Outdoor Classroom P-K to 8
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Watch the progression of seeds, plants and animals from late winter till June through journaling, discussions, photography music and poetry.
Electricity - how it works and how we measure and pay for it! 6 to 12
What is electricity, and where can we see it in our daily lives. This lesson is primarily informational, providing an easy-to-understand description of electricity and how it is literally all around us.
Electronic Poetry Project 6 to 12
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Students will utilize digital technology to create a presentation of a chosen or original poem. The project will include creating photos/videos, voice overs, original background music, and character generation to interpret a poem for classroom and podcast presentation.
Electronic Poetry Project 6 to 12
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The Electronic Poetry Project is a student-generated, project-based learning experience in which students utilize technology to develop skills in research, writing, and creativity to produce an audio/video presentation. Student-driven, project-based learning enhances lasting knowledge rather that just momentary learning.
Immigration Interview Podcast 10 to 11
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For this project, students interview local immigrants in our community about their experiences and turn these interviews into podcasts to be submitted to our local NPR radio station. This project corresponds with an American history unit on immigration at the turn of the 20th century
In the Days of our People: Shageluk, Alaska K to 12
Archiving Athabaskan Memories from Shageluk: Student projects
Let’s Get Excited about Roller Coasters! 5 to 9
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An amusement park has decided to open a theme park to be located in Waikoloa Village, Hawaii. It is an exciting time for the citizens of Waikoloa Village. Finally, this small town will be put on the map for something big. The residents are anxiously anticipating the grand opening of the amusement park. However, the operators of the amusement park need your help. They want to design a new roller coaster with a car that runs as smoothly as a marble would down the track. Your team has been hired to design this new roller coaster track for this theme park. Your task is to design a model of the track you would like to build for this amusement park. Your model must demonstrate the law of conservation of energy, gravity, force, momentum, and especially kinetic and potential energy.
Let’s Get Excited about Roller Coasters! 5 to 9
(0 stars, 1 ratings)
An amusement park has decided to open a theme park to be located in Waikoloa Village, Hawaii. It is an exciting time for the citizens of Waikoloa Village. Finally, this small town will be put on the map for something big. The residents are anxiously anticipating the grand opening of the amusement park. However, the operators of the amusement park need your help. They want to design a new roller coaster with a car that runs as smoothly as a marble would down the track. Your team has been hired to design this new roller coaster track for this theme park. Your task is to design a model of the track you would like to build for this amusement park. Your model must demonstrate the law of conservation of energy, gravity, force, momentum, and especially kinetic and potential energy.
Living Legends Video Griot Project 9 to 12
(0 stars, 2 ratings)
The purpose of this lesson is to physically connect students to history.This is a project based lesson that will culminate in students creatively gathering and telling the life story of significant community elders with a relationship to the school.
Local Geography’s Effect on Temperatures 6 to 12
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Students will gather data from weather websites and learn that inland cities’ temperatures can be more extreme than coastal areas.
Modern Day Proverbs 9 to 12
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This project is for the basic English 11 class. To show their comprehension of proverbs, students will create their own list of proverbs for the modern day generation. Relevancy of literature is necessary for today's student.
My Digital Story 9 to 12
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Digital storytelling is one of the most creative ways to encourage students to write narratives. The project allows students to use existing writing, photography and computer skills, and gives them a challenging platform to create more intense, interesting and personal stories.
My Ideal World 8 to 12
After reading the book To Kill a Mockingbird in English, students will use adobe Photoshop or GIMP Photoshop to create their own ideal worlds.
Newton's Laws for One and All! 8 to 10
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In this unit, students will create a digital portfolio of their learning. Students will collaborate on portions of this unit, while other parts are individual. This unit focuses on learning, applying, and working with Newton’s Laws of Motion. It is a layered curriculum unit which has students progressively building in their understanding and use of the laws.
Our Past is our Future: We will repeat it if we don't learn from it 8 to 12
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Purpose and Overview: Create a multimedia social science project where students collect the oral history from elder volunteers who live in the surrounding neighborhoods. The purpose is to prepare students with severe emotional and behavioral disabilities for transition into the community and work world after graduation from high school.
Persistence of Vision: Animation I 10 to 12
Students will study the early history of moving pictures as an introduction to the concept of persistence of vision and animation. Students will develop a final animation which utilizes a variety of animation sequences: computer drawn, stop motion, hand drawn, with a 6.0 megapixel Olympus digital camera and the Tool Factory software MultiMedia Lab V.
Photography 1: Seen through your eyes 9 to 12
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In introducing a new art elective option of Photography, I can enhance the importance of the arts in everyday education, and also give students another way to express their views. It's essential that all students have opportunities to create works that reflect what they see and believe in all disciplines.
Storytelling with a Document Camera 3 to 5
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Students will use the document camera to retell and put on a presentation of a Native American folktale, legend, or story that they read. This project aims to help students practice and enhance their reading fluency, comprehension, and speaking skills, as well as understand Native American history and culture.
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